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Shaving Cream Promotes Safety

Shaving Cream Promotes Safety

Invented in 1925, Burma Shave was a new product that changed shaving techniques. It was a cream rather than a traditional lather. It came in jars and tubes for easy dispensing. Many in the United States grew up reading the more than 500 different, fun, informative series of six roadside signs promoting Burma Shave. About 18 percent of all of the sign series became devoted to traffic safety and related safety issues. This article reproduces the safety sign sequences.

The Browder Life-Saving Net

The Browder Life-Saving Net

In 1887 Thomas Browder, a Civil War soldier, obtained a patent on the Browder Life-Saving Net. The purpose for the net was to allow rescue of people trapped in upper levels of buildings. They could jump to the energy-absorbing net. Many fire departments in the U.S and elsewhere adopted use of the net as part of their equipment. The popular net was not perfect but remained in use until about 1960 when other rescue methods replace it. Essentially, it was a forerunner for the backyard, circular trampoline of today.

Beverly Hills Supper Club Fire of 1977

Beverly Hills Supper Club Fire of 1977

One of the deadliest night club fires in United States history occurred on May 28, 1977 in Southgate, KY, just outside Cincinnati, OH. The very popular facility was crowed with more than 3,500 people. The building had several fire protection deficiencies. However, litigation that lasted longer than 10 years pointed mainly to the use of aluminum wiring during one of the last renovation projects for the night club. The club was destroyed and never rebuilt. The disaster left a scar for many in attendance that night largely because 165 died and 200 were injured.

Promoting the Safety Profession – 1923

Promoting the Safety Profession – 1923

Organized accident prevention effort in the United States started about some twelve or fifteen years ago. Since that time the whole plan of this activity may be measured up to the time of the big industrial slump. The progress and development in this great work was notable year by year and a new and most useful campaign, that of safety engineering, came into being and established itself.

Factory Inspection Challenge – 1905

Some of the earliest positions for ensuring safe workplaces were factory inspectors. This is a reprint of an article written by a factory inspector and published in a weekly social advocacy publication. The article challenges the ineffectiveness of factory inspections in New York State.

Plumbism and Saturnism

Plumbism and Saturnism

A work-related disorder that extends back centuries had the name plumbism until recent times. Another name was saturnism. Today we know the disorder as lead poisoning. This article reveals details from history.

Spanish Flu of 1918

Spanish Flu of 1918

It is timely to look back more than 100 years to the most devastating flu epidemic ever known. This article reviews the origins, spread and impacts of the flu and its role in WWI. Individuals, society and government actions sound somewhat familiar. However, death was much worse for those age 20 to 40.

Walter Dill Scott: Business Efficiency- 1912

Walter Dill Scott: Business Efficiency- 1912

Walter Dill Scott was a pioneer who linked psychology to business and advertising. His works on advertising first appeared in 1903 and 1909 and remain classics in the field.

Meet Alice Hamilton

Meet Alice Hamilton

One of the most important names in the history of safety and health is Alice Hamilton. This article introduces this pioneering woman. She defined occupational medicine and industrial hygiene as essential field of practice in protecting workers. She deserves the numerous honors recognizing her long and productive career.

NIOSH – Project MINERVA

NIOSH – Project MINERVA

About the mid-1980s NIOSH pursued a project to encourage inclusion of safety and health information in business school academic programs. The idea was to improve the long-term safety and health performance among employers.

NIOSH named the program Project Minerva. The name came from the Roman goddess of wisdom. The program sought to develop occupational safety and health materials and encourage schools of business to integrate them into existing undergraduate and graduate curricula.

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