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Factory Inspection Challenge – 1905

Some of the earliest positions for ensuring safe workplaces were factory inspectors. This is a reprint of an article written by a factory inspector and published in a weekly social advocacy publication. The article challenges the ineffectiveness of factory inspections in New York State.

Plumbism and Saturnism

Plumbism and Saturnism

A work-related disorder that extends back centuries had the name plumbism until recent times. Another name was saturnism. Today we know the disorder as lead poisoning. This article reveals details from history.

Spanish Flu of 1918

Spanish Flu of 1918

It is timely to look back more than 100 years to the most devastating flu epidemic ever known. This article reviews the origins, spread and impacts of the flu and its role in WWI. Individuals, society and government actions sound somewhat familiar. However, death was much worse for those age 20 to 40.

Meet Alice Hamilton

Meet Alice Hamilton

One of the most important names in the history of safety and health is Alice Hamilton. This article introduces this pioneering woman. She defined occupational medicine and industrial hygiene as essential field of practice in protecting workers. She deserves the numerous honors recognizing her long and productive career.

NIOSH – Project MINERVA

NIOSH – Project MINERVA

About the mid-1980s NIOSH pursued a project to encourage inclusion of safety and health information in business school academic programs. The idea was to improve the long-term safety and health performance among employers.

NIOSH named the program Project Minerva. The name came from the Roman goddess of wisdom. The program sought to develop occupational safety and health materials and encourage schools of business to integrate them into existing undergraduate and graduate curricula.

Early Accident Classification

Early Accident Classification

In 1922 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company published accident data for 1,928 industrial accidents for the year with classifications, frequency and percent. The classification scheme preceded any standards for accident classifications.

English as the Aviation Language

English as the Aviation Language

In order to reduce communication errors among pilots and controllers, English was first adopted as the language of aviation in 1944. Since then the English requirements have become a strict international aviation standard.

Springfield, IL – Sociological Survey – 1914

Springfield, IL – Sociological Survey – 1914

In the early 1900s, the Russell Sage Foundation sponsored some detailed studies of certain communities in the United States. One study focused on Springfield, Illinois. The study covered housing, education, industrial conditions, public health, and other important factors regarding the welfare of residents.

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